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tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until >> this change would have the implications not only for federal benefit programs like social security but also for income taxes. it would also affect the poverty threshold and guidelines published by the bureau of labor statistics, which in turn are used to determine eligibility for many low-income benefit programs. the congressional budget office recently estimated that moving to a change it cpi for vermin- wide would reduce the federal deficit by. .340 billion about 2/3 comes from reduced federal benefits. there are options other than the chained cpi for determining cost-of-living adjustments, and one of those is moving to a consumer price index for older americans. today we will have five speakers to discuss a broad range of issues related to the cost of living adjustment. each speaker will give a presentation and then we will open up for audience questions. bios are in your packets so i will not spend a lot of time on introductions, because we have a lot to cover. the packets also includes the presentations and the stat sh
and radar. we to have changes to talk about. and here is a quick look your kron 4 7 day around the bay a 20%-30 percent chance of rainfall. saturday and sunday showers more on your extended forecast, coming up. and as far as the traffic the bridges are looking clear this is a look at the bay bridge toll plaza. a relationship dispute could be to blame for a deadly marine base triple shooting. the tragedy happened friday in virginia -- both the shooter, and one of the two people murdered are from the bay area. this morning we are learning more about them. kron4's maureen kelly has uncovered new details about the pacifica man. who government officials say pulled the trigger, then turned the gun on himself. facebook photos posted by sgt oo-say-bio lopez.better known as levi to his friends.show him goofing off in his dress blues.making funny faces has he runs in formation in camouflage.and proudly posing with action movie star chuck norris. .an american flag flies over his family home in pacifica.the people inside saying they did not want to talk to the media at this time. a neighbor who did not
and the direction of what to move forward and that is it for march 25th and changing the facade from the grass to the metal and we can do that presentation as well. i would ask the board to consider maybe starting our meetings at 9:00, we have a very complex project and i understand, we have never had a time limit for when this board meeting would attend but it appears that most need to leave at noon and i would ask for consideration that we could start earlier, i can start as early as anybody can available and but we really need to start thinking about starting earlier, because there is a lot and it is a huge project and a lot of material and we don't want to keep disappointing the public that we are going to present something and we don't have the time. please allow us some consideration. >> i think that is an important request. any other... i am happy to start the board meetings at 9:00 a.m. if there is no objection, we can certainly. >> and i want to apologize to those of you who are here and not getting to present. >> i also just asked the board members if they can let me know in advance
rapid technological change and investments. and, you know, i have to say i think part of it is the public's deep-seeded unease with robots. i mean, this goes back to the hal -- [inaudible] and a few other things we remember from our childhood. and, of course, political theater it was, but senator rand paul's filibuster really, i think, did to some degree muddy public understanding of the domestic uses of uas. so we don't do ourselves any favors either from an industry standpoint when we keep changing the names. i could go around this room, and i bet everyone here could come up with a different one. uas, uav, rpv. and now, get this, the latest one? uninhabited aerial vehicles? oh, come on. sexism? give me a break. [laughter] i think our speakers will shed light, though, on some of the more important of uas concern. i'm so delighted that from california frank pace was willing and able to come in, the president and ceo of general b atomics. and, of course, the developer of the predator, among other very leading aircraft in this area. what i really think about it, and i th
of both the expanding economy and schedule changes in rules. a comparison average of about 18% over the past 40 years. at the same time, if current laws remain in place, federal spending will fall relative to the size of the economy and then rise again. the decline can be traced to be discretionary funding. and to a drop off that sense to go up when the economy is weak. -- that tend to go up when the economy is weak.but later in the decade, spending turns up again . part of this is the return of interest rates to more normal levels and our projection that would push up interest payments to nearly their highest share of gdp in did years. another of the decade a significant expansion of federal health-care programs and rising health-care costs per person will push up spending on the largest federal programs, social security, medicare, medicaid. by 2020.-- by 2023, it reaches 23% a g.d.p. what does this mean for federal debt that we expect that will reach 76% of gdp this year, at the highest since 1950. we protect it will be higher than the 39% average. it will be rising again as part
into the cpi, they don't boost the level of cpi. it's just a rate of change and the prices of things that are already out there. an interesting thing about the nature of new things that come in, new things, those who remember vcrs and dvd players, when they first came on the market they tend to be really expensive, and then they drop in price really fast. the cpi doesn't -- it does pick up the rapid drop in prices of stuff that comes up to be very expensive initially. new stuff is coming out all the time. and, of course, if your price index does not reflect anything about the real increase in incomes that generally happens for workers. okay, the second one which is number three, a modified version of price. back around the mid '90s, there was a change in the cpi w. that had been available for years and years. and is used for social security automatic cost-of-living adjustment, to reflect some other things to reflect some behavioral responses, behavioral practices that people have. there are 211 different categories of goods and services that build up all the cpi's. within each one of
changed, the problem is still evident to not that they actually continue. it's hard to see how congress could develop a more thorough record than a day. >> i'm not questioning whether the congress did its best. it's whether congress found with adequate to invoke his usual remedy. >> congress must've found the situation was even clearer and violations more evident because originally the vote in the senate was something like 79 to 18. in a 2006 extension of his 98 to nothing. there must've been even clearer in 2006 the these states were violating the constitution. do you think that's true? >> justice scalia, it was clear to 98 senators including every senator from a covered state who decided there was a continuing piece of legislation. >> or decided they'd better not vote against it. none of their entries in voting against it. >> i don't know what they're thinking exactly, but it seems to me one might reasonably think this, it's gotten a lot better, but it's still there. so if you have a revenue that wasn't totally over, wouldn't you keep there been any? or would she not at least say a pe
things have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those who speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today governor jeb bush understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remained an extremely important national voice in the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to the stage, let's first take stock and a handful of issues that we know where of vital importance to ronald reagan and square them up against the words and deeds of jeb bush on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut taxes for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than the federal government and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. governor jeb bush was in office he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk abut the size of government. ronald reagan was in the white house he dramatically re
replace resources that are thought to be on the downswing. the whole question of climate change, the environmental affects and fracking, they are all swarming around this leveraging consensus or close to it where instead we have more stuff lying around than we thought. >> if it is close, with the environment lists be happy about fracking, but not having all of it created equal? >> some would be happier than others in the community. someone a more vigorous role from the federal government. they want the interior government to regulate across the country. it probably goes a little bit further. i see the chairman trying to find middle ground on that. middle ground is elusive at the moment. oversight hearings are what the energy committee is doing right now. i definitely think that there is a big factor from the environmental community that wants to get back to renewable energy in general. that is why i think natural gas is important for renewable energy and sustained renewable energy. shining when the sun as the shining, when the wind is not blowing. i think that natural gas plays
to take that position. portman explained his change of heart in "the columbus dispatch". he said it began two years ago, when his college-age son told his family that he is gay. wall street backed up a bit as the week ended. that ended a ten-day winning streak by the dow jones industrial average-- its longest in 17 years. the dow industrial average lost 25 points to close at 14,514. the nasdaq fell nearly 10 points to close at 3,249. for the week, the dow gained just under 1%. the nasdaq rose a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: thousands of activists gathered this week for one of the conservative movement's biggest events. "newshour" congressional corresspondent kwame holman was there. >> reporter: for four decades the conservative political action conference known as "c- pac" has served as a barometer for republican politics. and this year, the g.o.p.'s future direction is the issue for more than 10,000 delegates who've been meeting just outside washington. at the last few gatherings of c- pac, the focus was on taking back the
that it actually changed people's lives and that it actually changed the culture. it's also come under criticism more recently, um, for not -- for only reflecting the lives of a very small group of people, for not talking about working class women who had no choice but to work all along and not talking about people of other sexual preferences who may have already found themselves kind of askew or outside of conventional life. but what i want to do today a little bit is talk about, um, the ongoing power of this classic. and i recently taught this book to my undergrads at nyu who, a couple of whom are in this audience, who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring, irrelevant, dated, no longer worthy of their important attention. [laughter] so it was actually kind of amazing to me that in this class, the class really came to life, and the books sort of spoke to them, um n really interesting ways. so i want to talk about the new feminine mystiques that are oppressing us still, and i want to talk about the old feminine mystique and whether it still oppresses us. and, you know, it's very
because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy of free will and human control on the criminal side versus the civil side and not surprisingly on both sides "the state wins" because on the criminal side you go to prison and on the civil side, you get incarcerated civilly. >> i don't think that's much of a disconnect. i think -- so i agree with you the test has changed. that's not what i'm talking about. if you look at the kind of distribution of behav
and conservative politics in particular.it is amazing. i didn't realize it at the time when my dad changed what he was interested in, you know, a few months later, i would change. i was going to go to west point where my dad went. you know, i could not see you with a west point education, it has opened up a lot.it is much more of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read "witness"? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday, and i read "witness", i think three times now.my family has not to read it. with communism having waned, it will be harder for them to do it. >> so what is the big deal? >> he was a great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was a soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states, it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joini
sunrise. we will talk about more sunshine. but things are definitely changing. come back and we will look at an interesting forecast when we return. >> thanks, lisa. also next lights went out across the world. why the power went out on the bay bridge, the golden gate bridge, and other landmarks across the globe. also a warning for shoppers. well, you better check out that new ipad before you leave the store. the unwanted surprise some the unwanted surprise some buyers arelet's play: [ all ] who's new in the fridge! our mystery guest: ensure complete... uh...do you support bones? [ ding! ] i've got calcium and vitamin d. oh! immune system. [ ding! ] one word: antioxidants. heart health? [ ding! ] my omega 3s never skip a beat. how 'bout muscles? [ ding! ] i have protein and revigor to protect, preserve, and promote muscle health. [ ding! ding! ding! ] that's a winner! ensure complete! [ female announcer ] the four-in-one nutrition of ensure complete. a simple choice to help you eat right. [ major nutrition ] ensure complete. nutrition in charge. ♪ sunlight says get up and go ♪ mountain
understand the change that andrew jackson brought to the white house? the first westerner. we have virginia presidents from the old south before that. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. he is not of the old planter class of the south that previous presidents had been from. not like a newly linder either. he brings different values and the french ambitions to the white house. was a widowgh he the president, the ghost of his wife, over the white house during his years there. why is that? >> she was the woman of his life. he loved her. when she died just a few months before he was inaugurated, he was a rest. he spent all of his time thinking about her and her memory and having her portraits in his bedroom so he could think of her. it really changed the way the first administration wins. >> we need to go into the campaign of 1822 understand the presidency. 1828 was the year of what? how did it change? >> it was the first time we did not have a majority of electors. the whole election was given over to the house of representatives. we had these
, just tell whausz you want us to be. we'll change for you. just tell us what you want us to do. we'll do it. that's not a political party. that's just a bunch of pandering idiots. is that the nature of ryan priebus effort? we want everybody to vote republican but we don't want it to matter too much to them on abortion and gay rights and cultural values. we don't want those to get in the way. >> i don't think that's exactly what the report did. i honestly -- >> did it mention sany of this stuff? >> i think priebus did a pretty good job saying we have a problem. i think people are going to interpret the report the way they want. one of the things that i thought it was problematic, they never said, look, we we have "x" core values. there's a home for them in the republican party but they never re-established the core values. some of the things relative to the presidential primaries. built in were biases which help wealthy candidates and frankly hurt tee party candidates and libertarians and that's billed throughout the effort. i do think it was a good effort. i think it's just a start. >> i
doing what they suggested, to stay -- say the states have the full power to uphold or to change or do anything was same- sex marriages? and what the strongest view of the challengers is in prop. 8 our calls distinguishes unconstitutional. is a standing argument. >> it would be in a weird way. it would probably mean that there be marriage equality restored in california. >> why? quiet the judgments stays in effect. the that is clear at all. it is more than that. >> what you think the governor will do? be weddingere would bells. >> this would be nothing to do that. the merits in the case, there is a narrower grounds which were basically judged by reinhard. california created a separate institution of domestic partnership. be that the would state that has done that has essentially disclaims any meaningful state interest in "m" wordg to hold the for same-sex couples. there is no real meaningful distinction. >> the question of whether the other 35 states have to. the other one would be taking california and in ticket back. >> what did he say? together.n -- woven them together. they're alwa
of that is going to change when gay couples are allowed to do the same. the fact is that throughout the nation's history, gay couples and gay individuals have been paying their taxes, and by paying our taxes, we help support all the legal benefits and protections of marriage. according to the government accountability office, there are over 01100 legal benefits and protections that are given to married couples. we have been subsidizing those throughout the nation's history. yet we are unable to take advantage of those same incentives to marry. that cannot be constitutional. host: let me ask you this. should the court be jumping in at this point? one of the arguments being made by the lawyers for proposition 8, today's oral argument, is that there is a social movement happening. polls are showing more people in favor. let that take place. let states decide what they want to do. is there a role for the supreme court? caller: of course there is. this cannot be accomplished in a piecemeal, state-by-state basis. most of the legal benefits of marriage come from the federal government. but me give yo
and in limbo. this must change. it is unfair. it is just not the american way and this country is ready for it. but i will agree with brian on this. no matter what, there's been so much momentum. no matter what happens with this, get california, that will be the tenth straight in the district of columbia with the marriage equality. 278 of america's largest corporations said it is bad for business to discriminate leading up to the court cases. we saw several senators from rockport, claire mccaskill to mark warner come out and say they're in support. the tide has turned. it is safe for even republicans to come out now. there's no going back so the court might as well take that step and do the right thing today. >> john: i'm glad you mentioned the corporations. we've learned in this age of supermergers, our politicians don't mind when corporations marry corporations, even polygamy. i want to talk about justice scalia's comments on children raised by same-sex couples. of course, he's against gay marriage traditionally because of his catholic background, a follower of jesus who was a noted nonhomop
change as well. at the same time, there are 130,000 married same-sex couples in the united states today who doma says requires the federal government to treat those 130,000 married same-sex couples as unmarried in each of those federal context. that is what caused what happened to edie to happen, that she was treated as on married -- unmarried although she spent 40 years with the woman who became her spouse. they spent time together, good times and bad, in sickness and health, just like any married couple, and for the federal government to pretend there marriage does not exist is unfair, un-american, and unconstitutional. >> hi. i am donna lieberman, the executive director of the american civil liberties union. i am proud to stand here today as part of team edie windsor. my state, the state of new york, respects the right of all couples, straight or gay, to marry. so long as doma is on the books, these marriages are not truly equal. the federal government treats new york's lesbian and gay families as though they do not exist. it is time to put any end to doma and the 2-tiered system of
of president will change that equation. it may, however, move both sides closer to a deal but i think the revenue increases are going to be a difficult part until you get postsequester. >> congressman, i agree with everything you just said and speak to a couple of theories floetding around that the dysfunction we see in washington now is purposeful. e.j. dion suggests perhaps to make it hard for the president to accomplish anything that sort of shrinking the calendar on the affirmative portion of this administration. but also, trying to talk about people dislike congress more, thus speaking to the republican, larger republican theory that congress is at a -- government is the problem, thus leading to the idea that government should be shrunk. what do you think about those theories? >> i think it's little conspire toirl. you have differences from both sides. going to be difficult to just bridge that gap easily. and it's been difficult for democrats to move toward the republican side and vice versa. bringing government down doesn't help the republicans at this point. the president's the
. there is no nice way to tell seniors you're changing social security. to tell latinos we're profiling you, we're suppressing your vote. we don't need a smile. we need new policies. thank you for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> religious war. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. i'm not washington. let me start tonight with this. you can't steer a car with the engine off. it's problem with the republican party today. get rid of the cultural right, abortion and gay marriage, all those began who moving to the republican party over prayer in public school years ago and you kill one giant engine. get rid of the whackos as john mccain cats them and you lose another engine. all the libertarians who just want government out of their face and out of their lives and you kell another engine. try to do what reince priebus is doing right now and you will see the problem, try steering the car with your engine dead. try steering the political party once you kill the motor. you set out to kill the big motors of the republican party itself. for pr
. but several astonishing insights that blackett's small team proved early on changed their minds. probably dramatic was a calculation the scientists made showing that the tactics the navy had orders its air crews to follow in attacking u-boats -- even though it seems like a perfectly sensible approach on its face -- was, in fact, unlikely ever successful in sinking a u-boat. the navy commanders had actually done a somingly reasonable calculationing themselves. -- seemingly reasonable calculation themselves. they knew how much time typically elapsed between the moment a patrol plane spotted a u-boat and the u-boat spotted the patrol plane and dove beneath the surface. they knew how fast a u-boat could dive. they knew it was of 45 seconds that a u-boat had been out of sight by the time the patrol plane got into position to develop a depth charge, and they figure a u-boat could have gotten to about 150 feet below the surface at that point. so they said, okay, 150 feet, that's the best average. the trouble was, as blackett's scientists realized once they started sifting through this data, was
a homeless man who found a diamond engagement ring in his change cuff and he returned it to its grateful owner. that one good deed completely changed his life. he will be here to tell us all about it. >> looking forward to that. we begin, though, this morning with that early spring snowstorm rolling across the country. we are keeping you very busy, phyllis. >> this weather is just relentless. good morning, ereka. good morning, everyone. parts of the midwest from wichita, kansas, all the way to indianapolis are seeing more heavy snow this morning as we deal with the winter weather that doesn't want to end. >> on i-25 near johnston, colorado, a fiery collision between a tanker truck and a car. >> looks like the propane was caught on fire with people. you can't even describe what it looked like. you can't even describe it. >> reporter: along with it a massive pile-up. >> four or five semis and, like, 40 cars. truck drivers on the road, it's tough. i never see anything like this. >> reporter: one wrecked vehicle was pulled after another out of the tangled pile of steel. several people were h
biography of rachael jackson. understand the amount of change that kantor jackson brought to washington. >> -- andrew jackson brought to washington. >> he is the first westerner. we have va. presidents before that. jackson is somebody completely different. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. --n though he is a planter, he was not like a new england int -- new englanders island -- either. he brought very different values and very different ambitions. >> even though he was awaited -- would president. >> she was the one of his life. a few months, at before he went to be inaugurated, and he was bereft. he spent all of his time thinking about her and her memory and having her pictures, portraits in the bedroom. it really changed. >> we need to delve into the campaign of 1828 to understand the presidency. -- how did itr of change? >> it was the first time we did not have the majority of electors. the election was given over to the house of representatives. he'll have these multiple competing factions in the house of representatives. you have c
of time for congress to talk about this. >> programs where you have changed money from one account to another. you cannot do that under this type of thing that we are talking about. >> some flexibility to rearrange funding programs. training and maintenance and so forth. reporter: remember that date for the federal for lysistrata? by midnight the next day, congress must pass a $900 billion spending bill to fund government operations wee a government shutdown takes place with worse consequences than the $850 billion aggressor. it has been scheduled this way since january. lawmakers knew that they could use the bill funding government operations to adjust where the cuts get made. if it doesn't get fixed, republicans now say that there is only one place to look. >> of the president chooses not to use that and goes after high-profile spending cuts, and that is a choice that what he will have made for political reasons four the president, for the fourth year in a row has not produced a budget proposal on time. it is not expected before the end of march. the next three months will see li
: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 45, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: move to reconsider. mr. mccain: move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent to speak up to two minutes and after my remarks the senior senator from arizona be recognized. the presiding officer: is there objection? is there objection to the modified request? without objection. mr. brown: madam president, thank you. i want to not yet call up, i've been working with chairwoman mikulski on this until they get an agreement but i'll just discuss for a moment amendment 83 i'm cosponsoring with senator isakson of georgia. it really does help us restore as chairmanwoman mikulski has been working towards, regular order in this chamber. this is an amendment having to do with some chang dealing -- language de
conservative. in a cnn exclusive, senator rob portman explains the personal reasons behind his change of heart. >>> and a bizarre and tragic medical mystery. a man dies after receiving a transplanted kidney tainted with rabies. how could this happen in the united states of america? how many other people are at risk right now? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." forget all those wacky scenes of north korea's leader joking around with dennis rodman. the united states, the obama administration, right now taking the north's threats of a nuclear attack very seriously. the pentagon has just announced it will beef up america's defense missile systems out on the west coast. in california, oregon, washington state. let's go straight to cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence, watching what's going on. chris, a lot of us are stunned by this decision but update us on what is going on. >> wolf, we just came out of a briefing where we learned the pentagon is going to spend a billion dollars to put new intercepter missiles on the west coast. now, that plan includes react investigating a mi
relationship is first established and annually in paper form, even if no policy changes have occurred. my bill would require institutions to provides these notices only if they have changed the policy or practice related to the privacy of the consumer. this may seem like a simple little change, but its impact on financial institutions is significant. requiring these institutions to send annual notices even when no changes have made are redundant, unnecessary and costly. mr. speaker, this bill will permit financial institutions to redirect these resources towards lending, staffing and lowering the cost of financial services. for consumers, these mailings typically serve to clog up mailboxes and confuse even the best of us. in fact, a recent voter survey indicated that fewer than one quarter of the consumers read the privacy notifications they receive and over 3/4 would be more likely to read them if they were only sent when the institution changed its policies. this bill will make the mailings more significant stop consumers because they would only come after a change in policy. let me reiterat
. >> a lot of things i need to change. tu thanks. up next, what facebook is saying about tiger woods' latest love affair. ession. before taking abilify, an antidepressant alone helped me get out from under. but sometimes...depression still dragged me down. i'd been feeling stuck for a long time. so my doctor added abilify to my antidepressant. she said some people had symptom improvement as early as 1 to 2 weeks. now i feel more in control of my depression. [ female announcer ] abilify is not for everyone. call your doctor if your depression worsens or you have unusual changes in behavior, or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. elderly dementia patients taking abilify have an increased risk of death or stroke. call your doctor if you have high fever, stiff muscles, and confusion to address a possible life-threatening condition. or if you have uncontrollable muscle movements, as these could become permanent. high blood sugar has been reported with abilify and medicines like it and in extreme cases can lead to coma or death. other risks
. >> drivers on the golden gate bridge can expect to see some changes starting today as automatic toll officially kick in this week. the supreme court takes up the issue of same-sex marriages week, details ahead. >> check out this live shot from our mt. tam, a beautiful start to the morning. temperatures right now mainly in the 40's and '50's but we have dropped into the upper 30 degree territory for some of our upper north bay valleys. we have been monitoring the potential for wet weather, the latest model shows backing off on the chance of midweek rain. i will talk about when you will need your umbrella is coming up in just a few minutes. >> a live look at the golden gate bridge, traffic moving well in the southbound direction. your quick commute check shows like conditions for the north bay and the ride for the golden gate bridge. light conditions as well for the peninsula. still doing pretty well in the south bay, more east bay freeways including interstate 888680 are showing some signs of slowing along with i way for their antioch and 583 of the mob pass. >> i will remind everybod
're trying to do. but governor bush seemed to change his stance somewhat during a series of recent interviews prompting tough criticism from senate majority leader harry reid. >> let's wait for a few minutes and see how jeb bush changes his mind again. his opinion on immigration is not evolving. it's devolving. he keeps going backwards. i think he's frankly made a fool of himself the last 24 hours. frankly, on this issue, i don't think jeb bush is a florida leader. i think marco rubio is. bush has been elected to nothing lately. rubio is the leader on immigration. >> okay. joe, a new poll by latino decisions shows immigration reform is by far the most important issue for hispanic voters. that's by the economy and jobs, education and health care. >> john heilemann, let's talk, john heilemann, about your next book. bush -- "game change 2016." i think this may have to be the opening scene of jeb getting out of a cab in the middle of the dark, you know, in a cold march morning and walking into the "today" show when announcing that he's changed his mind. i mean, the second i heard it, i said, the
for thousands of years. to try to change that -- it is time to pull out of there, get our guys on, let them be. host: that was jim in minneapolis. joining us is tom chancre, a pentagon national security correspondent for the new york times. hello. guest: how are you this morning? host: good, thank you. how surprising was this development of hamid karzai accusing the u.s. of working with the taliban? guest: it was absolutely surprising. we spoke with general dunn furred, the new commander of coalition forces -- dunford, the new commander of coalition forces. chuck hagel said it was ridiculous claim. hamid karzai as a domestic and international audience. this was surprising, but for the domestic crop. host: how significant was our push back? we are seeing this on the front page of all the papers. this is getting some play here. what are the domestic implications? guest: in afghanistan, it is unclear. in the united states, we have to reassess what kind of partner is mr. karzai going to be. these are very important 12 months ahead in which the entire security mission is transitioning to the afghan
through some name changes. included surveilling reporters and journalists. if you wire the electronic system, it makes it difficult unless you engage in other means to get information to a reporter or a journalist. obviously, if you are concerned about disclosures that are unauthorized, wow, keep a tab on any and all connections. that not just white ends know for a fact that that actually took place in secret. this is no different, but on a larger scale. it was what happened in the 60s and 70s. wiretapping reporters and journalists finding out who their sources were. if you know who the sources are, i'll just go after the source. so here is where it gets disturbing. this is another paradox of what happened. on and off the record, any number of them have told me privately. it is chilling. even long-time deep sources of government are increasingly reluctant to speak even off the record. even on deep background. why is that? they are afraid. do you know what it means to be afraid of your own government? because of just the possibility that they could get tipped off if you have contact wi
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
, but cooper acknowledged that the country's understanding of marriage is changing rapidly, he says evolution should continue without the supreme court's interference. as mother jones put it, cooper was supposed to argue that california had a legitimate interest other than simple bigotry in banning same-sex couples in getting married. he difficult finding one. cooper found that marriage is about pro creation, but justice elena kagan challenged this argument. >> if you arory the age of 55, you don't help us serve the government's interest in regulating pro creation, through marriage so why is that different? >> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both couples -- both parties to the relationship are infer tile. >> i can assure you if both the women and man are over 55, there are not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> a lesson in fertility. justice stephen breyer acknowledged, there are a lot of people who get married who can't have children. and what of the same-couples who do have children? cooper argued harm could be done to them an
the change of a latitude. >> why are you so confident in that attitude? how many states permit gay couples to marry? >> today? nine, your honor. >> nine. so there has been this sea change between now and 1996? >> i think with respect to the understanding of gay people and their relationship, i think there is a sea change. >> i suppose the sea change has a lot to do with the force and effectiveness of people supporting your side of the case? >> the chief justice of the united states supreme court also faulted president obama for enforcing doma but not defending it. >> if he has made a determination that executing the law by enforcing the terms is unconstitutional, i don't see why he doesn't have the courage of his convictions and execute, not only the stat us, but do it consistent with his view of the constitution, rather than saying we will wait until the supreme court says we have no choice. >> the white house says they enforce plenty of laws he doesn't agree with. >> the justices were not leaving much drama there. but i can tell it you who has been silent in washington this week and that
of changes unless you want to screw with some of the numbers in the report. they really did not do a lot. jeff: this is rallying today based on the report. >> it will still attract a lot of planting this year. we did not change a lot of the numbers. now we are looking at march 28. jeff: tell me about this, this exchange had a lot of funds in, a lot of funds, a lot of investment. >> they got a little bit ahead of themselves. dollar-denominated products should automatically go up. we are going to be inflating. those people had to take their money back out. jeff: we look at soybeans today. also, perish on soybeans. perish on wheat today. the volumes are so thin. it is typical. jeff: scott, appreciate it so much. alwayy nice to see you. what can i tell you. is pretty much just unchanged. tracy: jeff flock, thank you very much. ashley: the safe haven seem to be slipping away as more and more americans are dipping into retirement savings just to get by. the largest mutual fund company says people taking out loans against their account is just 12% said 2008. tracy: america not voted the top cou
have opinion of republicans has changed and there are people still like john mccain who are very pro-military, but, you know, but that's no longer where the weight of opinion in the republican party is. >> that's a good point. >> the difference here is that you can support the military. you can insist that nothing ever take away from our military readiness. you can demapped that no cut ever impedes anyone on the frontline, and acknowledge that the pentagon -- i mean, the pentagon budget grows exponentially every year. you could acknowledge that you can trim from that budget. now, no one suggested that the military cuts were artful, strategic, or wise. they simply said that if the sequester is going to happen, we're not going to raise taxes again because we have such an objection to the way -- but, i mean, let me just say, no republican is pleased with the way that the military cuts were crafted in the sequester. they simply prefer to have the sequester happen than to raise taxes again 12 weeks later. >> that in and of itself i think is a change. they would rather go for inartful meat
of the service and how it will forever change them. >> it is a beautiful ceremony and a fitting tribute. i happen to know that he worked for porch in santa cruz to four he went to another agency. i will miss him. >> the best we that we can honor those officers that lost their lives is for us to go out and do our best every day every day. >> to see that many people honored us is more than what i can put into words it is uplifting. i know that the hard work is ahead and we have a lot of support out there. for people that care about us. i think that we will get through this. if it causes people to stop, think. what our role is and what it means to return with honor at the end of the day. that is the best possible with a chicken honor these will legacies of these very fine officers the sacrificed everything for their community. >> reporter: this is a photograph of the daughter, gillian. she got out of a limousine to embrace this person along the sidewalk. they had the employees and to me, that shows you how touch to the family is. they have the-embraced --. from inside the service and outside. report
a fundamental transformation, a systemic change, something we in central and eastern europe had to do 20 years ago, something similar. the other part of the problem is the european integration model, the excessive and unnatural centralization, harmonization, standardization, and unification of the european continent based on the concept of an ever-closer union is another obstacle. a few days ago i listened to the speech given by the italian minister of the economy, and he made a point that to build such an integration was a necessity. i raised my hand, and asked, what you mean, such an integration of the current form of european integration is an historical accident. it could have many developments, many of variants, and i am sure this one is the wrong one. these complex issues deserve to be discussed from many perspectives, but it is evident they found their climax in the attempt to monetary unify the whole continent. this was the moment, to use the ogy, when the marginal costs exceeded their benefits. this evidence failure -- and it is appropriate to call it a failure -- was inevitable, byec
. >> what a sight you are. >> it is nice to be in a room full of conservatives for a change. >> we will not be demonized and we will not be silent. >> we have to get the momentum back. >> it is time to unite. >> governors saying it's the stupid party. what a horrible statement to make. >> the liberal media can keep hating on me. >> media bias played an overwhelming role in defining the candidates. >> the odds aren't looking so great right now for republicans that you're on a suicide mission. >> you're going to hear this afternoon from marco rubio, the r.g. iii of american politics. >> we don't need a new idea. there is an idea. the idea is called america. >> our country is a total mess. >> they call me crazy? they call us crazy? they say we're crazy? i mean. >> i've made over $8 billion. >> i utterly reject pessimism. ♪ ain't nothing but a party >>> good afternoon, we begin with the republican retreat where the gop is facing its severely complicated future. it's known as the conservative political action conference, or as we like to call it, cpac. the conundrum at hand, how to fi
and conservative politics in particular. it is amazing. i didn't realize it at the time when my dad changed what was interested in, you know, a few mons later, i would change. i was going to go to west point where my dad went. you know, i could not see you a west point idcation, it has opened up a lot. it is much more of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read once? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday and i read on once, i think the times now. so what is the big deal. he was great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joining the losing side not the winning side, and then, of course, his famous clash with the state department official who he id
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